18 Tips on How to Move Out of Your Parents’ House

Moving out of your parents' home is a major lifetime milestone.

When you’re planning to buy your first home, start by getting pre-approved for a mortgage. This will show you what you qualify for and will prepare you for house hunting.

There are many other items you’ll want to add to your to-do list, as well. Here are 18 tips that will show you how to move out of your parents’ house:

1. Talk to Your Family

Let your family know that you are ready to move out and discuss your options with them. They may be your best source of advice and assistance.

Family and friends who have made moves in the past can put you in touch with the resources you’ll need along the way, such as moving companies, lenders, and real estate agents.

2. Choose a Moving Date

Deadlines are highly motivating. Pick a target move date and commit to it. This will help you focus on checking off your to-do list.

This date is your goal, but it’s not set in stone. Your actual moving date can change based on the closing date you and the home seller agree to, but choosing a target date will help you stay on track.

3. Start Saving Money

It’s no secret that moving into your own place costs money.

Whether you’re paying a security deposit and first month’s rent or a down payment to buy a house, there will typically be out-of-pocket expenses.

The more money you have in savings, the better.

4. Budget for Your New Home

Budgeting for your new home will help you decide how much you want your housing payment to be, and it’s one of the most important things you’ll do.

To do this, calculate all potential monthly expenses:

  • Research basic utility costs in the area
  • Know what you spend on car payments, insurance, and gas
  • Track your food and entertainment expenses
  • Account for haircare, clothing, and other services

Once you have your total monthly budget, compare that to your take-home income. This will make it easy to set a target monthly payment for your new housing payment.

5. Build Your Credit

One of the most often asked questions is what credit score you need to buy a house. The answer can vary, but a qualifying credit score is typically in the 580-620 range. 

No matter what your credit looks like, there are a few steps you can take to improve it:

  • Check your credit report for errors
  • Settle outstanding debts in collection
  • Don’t acquire new debt
  • Don’t close credit accounts
  • Pay your bills on time
  • Pay down your credit card debt

Some of these may seem obvious, but they are important and can improve your credit score quickly.

6. Get Pre-Approved for Your Mortgage

It’s never too early to get pre-approved. 

You’ll complete a simple questionnaire and provide income documentation. This basic information helps the lender determine the size of loan you qualify for. Be sure to inquire about first-time homebuyer programs that can assist you with the down payment.

The most significant benefit of a pre-approval letter for you is that it allows you to start house hunting with confidence. Plus, home sellers will rarely entertain offers from buyers who aren’t pre-approved, so this will enable you to submit an offer as soon as you find a home you love. Mortgage pre-approvals are good for up to 90 days, but they are simple to refresh if your time frame is a bit longer.

7. Decide Where to Live

Travel around the neighborhoods of your target city to see what areas you’re drawn to. 

Consider your commute distance to work and what amenities are important to you.  If you prefer outdoor activities, access to restaurants, theaters, shopping, or all of the above, make sure your target area meets your needs.

You’ll also need to pick the kind of house you want. Do you want a single-family home, condo, or townhome? Do you want a move-in ready house or a fixer-upper?

Once you narrow things down and pick how many bedrooms and bathrooms you want, you’re ready for house hunting.

8. Choose a Real Estate Agent

Now that you know what you want and how much you can afford, it’s time to find an excellent real estate agent.

Your real estate agent is one of the most valuable members of your home buying team. Each neighborhood and suburb offer various housing options, and a local agent will be familiar with what is available in your price range.

They’ll help submit your offer, manage negotiations, and keep you updated on each step along the way.

9. Start Touring Houses

Attend local open houses to see what’s available in the area.

Bring a checklist with you to keep track of your must-have and nice-to-have items in each house you see. Some good things to look for during a home tour are:

  • Number and size of bedrooms and bathrooms
  • Kitchen layout and finishings
  • Parking availability
  • Front and back yard preferences
  • Type and condition of the floors
  • Single or dual pane windows
  • Overall layout and how it works with your lifestyle

Also, exploring the neighborhoods will give you the best idea of what it’s like to live there.

10. Join Social Groups Online

If you’re staying in your current location, you may already have a strong social network. If you’re moving to a new city, join some social groups online to get connected and to learn more about the place you’re moving to.

In addition to general groups, hunt for specialized groups around your hobbies, interests, or volunteer opportunities like Habitat for Humanity

Joining Facebook groups, Bumble BFF, Meetup, and other social media are all great ways to meet new people.

11. Purchase Your Home

You've found a home you love and decided you're ready to submit an offer — congratulations!

The process isn’t over when your offer is accepted, but you’re getting close. Your mortgage expert and your real estate agent will be there to guide you through appraisal, inspection, contingencies, repairs, insurance, and the final closing.

12. Select an Official Move Out Day

Your final offer will include an agreed-upon closing date, so you’ll know when you get your keys long in advance. Then you get to choose what day you want to move in.

Consider if you want to do any work on the home before you move in. It’s much easier to update a kitchen or paint an empty room before you move, so plan accordingly.

13. Declutter and Donate Extra Items

Don’t wait until your move date to declutter and get rid of things you don’t want. Do this right away.

Divide your belongings into three categories: keep, sell, and donate. Goodwill Industries and the Salvation Army are two great organizations that will gladly take your usable items.

Move the unwanted items on to their new owners as soon as possible. You’ll be happy you’re not carrying unneeded items into your new living space.

14. Start Packing

As you sort through things, go ahead and start packing.

Begin with seasonal clothing, books, memorabilia, and any household items you won’t need in the next few weeks.

Most importantly, label boxes by room. Using color codes, numbers, or clearly marked labels will ensure that boxes are placed in the appropriate room during the move.

15. Schedule your move

Are you planning a do-it-yourself move? Give family and friends plenty of notice when asking for their help.

If you want a professional mover, schedule them as soon as possible. If you are moving locally, the mover will move everything over on the same day.

If you are planning a DIY move, it may take a bit longer.

16. Call to Set-up Utilities

Once you know the transfer date, call to have utilities put in your name and advise them of the date of transfer, so everything is operational when you move, including:

  • Water
  • Gas
  • Electricity
  • Sewer
  • Internet
  • Trash services

Some utilities can require a deposit to begin service, so make sure you’re prepared.

17. Change Your Address


As you get closer to your move date, set aside time to change your address with the post office, as well as directly updating your address with your bank, credit card companies, and streaming services. 

Let your health care providers know as well, such as doctors, dentists, or veterinarians.

18. Unpack and Enjoy Your New Home

Your hard work has paid off. It's time to unpack and settle in!

Be patient with yourself through this process. Getting your furniture and possessions in place takes time. Focus on the immediate necessities — kitchen items, personal care, and clothing — and work on everything else later.

Moving into your own place is incredibly rewarding. Knowing how to move out of your parents’ house and planning ahead of time will be satisfying and ensure you’re moving into a home that works for your lifestyle and budget.

Just remember you’re not in this alone. If you’d like help with buying your first home, get in touch with Homebuyer today. We’re here to help every step of the way.

Dan Green

Dan Green

Dan Green is a former mortgage loan officer and an industry expert. He's appeared on NPR and CNBC, and in The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, and dozens of local newspapers. Dan has helped millions of first-time home buyers get educated on mortgages, real estate, and personal finance. Have mortgage questions? Ask Dan in the chat.

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